What Time is Love is published!

My debut novel is now out in the world… available in hardback, as an eBook and as an audiobook. For links to online retailers, click here, or The LRB Bookshop and Waterstones in Sheffield have some signed copies!

Continue reading “What Time is Love is published!”

Why real love stories aren’t about fate or destiny

Have you ever wondered if you would have fallen in love with the same people if you’d lived in a different time? Would you even have met them, in an era with different social mobility – and if you had, would the relationships have worked out?

Review: Reward System, Gem Calder

These six short stories are almost a novel, interlinked by characters who drift and reconnect with one another in the way friends do, living a big-city, post-university life.

How to research a novel

One of the pleasures of fiction is imagining yourself into the minds of others, into other times or other places – and to make that believable, you’ll need both background research and specific details.

What Time is Love? update…

Publication day approaches… and has been brought forward to 26 May 2022. What Time is Love? is available for pre-order now, from your favourite independent bookstore, or this link takes you to a range of online retailers. Final copies are imminent, but we have a cover design!

How to finish a novel

This first post in a series of blogs about writing was going to be on how to start a novel. But I feel like starting is rarely the problem – whereas finishing often is. Whether you plan a book out or plunge right in, the beginning is always full of shimmery possibility. And then… the […]

Review: Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Leeds Playhouse

It’s a smart bit of programming to revive this scrappy, joyful rock musical about a resilient genderqueer performer right now – and to ride the wave of mainstream interest in drag queens by casting Divina De Campo.

How the first ever pop star blazed a trail of innovation

Think of an era-defining, wildly popular pop star: are you picturing David Bowie? Prince? Elton John? None of those names achieved anything like the domination of arguably Britain’s first popular music star: Charles Dibdin.