Dali and Duchamp: these mischievous mavericks shaped the 21st century

Published in BBC Culture on November 20, 2017

Marcel Duchamp and Salvador Dalí: two titans of modern art who might appear to have little in common. One is the father of conceptual art, who turned his back on the commercialisation of that world in favour of playing chess; the other is famous as a painter – and just as famous for embracing fame, a dandyish personality who knew how to sell himself. Continue reading “Dali and Duchamp: these mischievous mavericks shaped the 21st century”

Review: Network, National Theatre

Published in The Independent on November 15, 2017

“I’m mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore”: the rallying cry from Paddy Chayefsky’s 1976 film about Howard Beale, a news anchor who loses it on-air, has become a much-quoted meme, as the film seems only more prophetic with each passing year. Continue reading “Review: Network, National Theatre”

The ‘most painted woman in the world’

Published in BBC Culture on November 13, 2017

She is known as ‘the most painted woman in the world’: around 225 artists have captured the captivating likeness of Suzy Solidor, including Tamara de Lempicka, Jean Cocteau, Francis Bacon, Man Ray and Francis Picabia. A French cabaret star, she was a major mainstream recording artist in the 1930s – even though she sang really rather explicit songs of lesbian desire. Today, however, the chanteuse is hardly a familiar face. Continue reading “The ‘most painted woman in the world’”

Review: Labour of Love, Noel Coward Theatre

Published in The Independent on October 6, 2017

Why was the red rose chosen by Labour as its new symbol during rebranding in the Nineties? “Because it looks pretty but is full of pricks,” quips party faithful Jean, in a play that sugars its analysis of the internal struggles of the Labour Party with an extremely high gag rate. Continue reading “Review: Labour of Love, Noel Coward Theatre”