Review: Bitter Wheat, Garrick Theatre

Published in Time Out June 20, 2019

Really, what is the point? Why stage this? I write with weariness, not anger. Because it’s all too tiresome, and too predictable. Turns out, nope, we really didn’t need a Harvey Weinstein play, written by a man and from a male perspective. The whole thing leaves you feeling… grubby.

Continue reading “Review: Bitter Wheat, Garrick Theatre”

Lee Krasner: The wild artist who brought colour to dazzling life

Published in BBC Culture June 4, 2019

“Change is life.” So said Lee Krasner, in an interview in 1972 – in doing so, the artist captured a truth about her work as well an essential fact of human existence. As an artist, she never stayed still; unlike many of the other Abstract Expressionists she’s sometimes grouped with, Krasner never developed a signature style, but instead remained restlessly reinventive.

Continue reading “Lee Krasner: The wild artist who brought colour to dazzling life”

Andrea Dunbar: does the revival of interest in a working-class genius focus too much on her troubled personal life?

Published in the i May 29, 2019

Andrea Dunbar is back in Bradford – and back down the pub. After writing three scorchingly honest, brutal comedy-dramas – The Arbor, Rita Sue and Bob Too, and Shirley – about life on the Buttershaw estate in Bradford, the playwright died of a brain haemorrhage in a pub toilet in 1990 at the age of 29.

Continue reading “Andrea Dunbar: does the revival of interest in a working-class genius focus too much on her troubled personal life?”

Review: Frankkkistein by Jeanette Winterson

Published in The Independent May 24, 2019

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein has certainly had a vivid afterlife: subject to countless adaptations, rewrites, and remakes. Jeanette Winterson is the latest to re-animate the 19th-century Gothic classic, both playfully and sometimes arduously bringing it into a contemporary world of smart-tech and artificial intelligence (AI). 

Continue reading “Review: Frankkkistein by Jeanette Winterson”

Cate Le Bon: ‘I’d play piano to stop thinking about chairs’

Published in the i May 23, 2019

Cate Le Bon has spent just over a decade carving her own musical niche, via surreal lyrics sung in a deep, deadpan voice, angular guitar parts and wonky, ear-snagging melodies. I’m meeting her ostensibly to talk about her fifth album, Reward. Instead, we’re chatting about furniture.

Continue reading “Cate Le Bon: ‘I’d play piano to stop thinking about chairs’”

The princess who thought she was made of glass

Published in BBC Culture May 16, 2019

A young princess in 19th-Century ringlets and a flouncy white dress creeps across the stage and eyeballs the audience warily. “I’m of a very delicate nature,” she tells us. “And it is all made far more complicated due to the fact that I have a grand piano inside me… a grand piano would be bad enough but this one happens to be made out of glass.”

Continue reading “The princess who thought she was made of glass”