Money matters – financial inequality in straight relationships

Published in Cosmopolitan on June 1, 2022

Jasmine’s sitting across from David* in the pub. It’s their first date and he’s living up to his Tinder profile – charming, good-looking, and seemingly the perfect mix of ambitious and kind. He paid for dinner, and she was keen to continue the evening in the pub.

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Why real love stories aren’t about fate or destiny

Published in The Independent on May 26, 2022

Have you ever wondered if you would have fallen in love with the same people if you’d lived in a different time? Would you even have met them, in an era with different social mobility – and if you had, would the relationships have worked out?

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Why assume it’s a problem if a woman is child-free at thirty? Maybe she prefers it that way

Published in The Observer January 30, 2022

It was news last week that women are having fewer children and at a later age: the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reported that more than half of women in England and Wales don’t have children by the time they are 30. But it hardly felt surprising to me.

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The Green Homes Grant is an own goal for Rishi Sunak

Published in The Sunday Times November 22, 2020

When the Green Homes Grant was announced in July it seemed like perfect timing. I was in the process of buying my first home, a draughty Victorian terraced house in Sheffield. The idea that the government would help pay to insulate it properly, and replace the ancient single glazing — to the tune of several thousands of pounds — within a month or so of me moving in appeared . . . almost too good to be true.

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More than just a miniskirt: Two exhibitions reveal how Mary Quant shaped our world

Published in The Independent February 2, 2019

If you’re a British woman, you’ve probably got Mary Quant in your wardrobe. OK, maybe not literally – but if there’s a sleeveless shift or a tunic dress, a Peter Pan collar or a skinny-rib sweater, a pair of brightly coloured tights or even a PVC raincoat, you’re wearing Quant. And that’s before mentioning her most famous creation: the miniskirt.

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Sex With Robots and Other Devices explores what happens when AI meets shagging

Published in New Statesman on May 11, 2018

Imagine a world where your partner could arrive in an Amazon package. So goes the tagline for Sex With Robots and Other Devices, a new play about to open at London’s Kings Head Theatre. Continue reading “Sex With Robots and Other Devices explores what happens when AI meets shagging”

Welsh singer Gwenno’s new album is in Cornish. It’s one of many ‘lost’ languages being reborn

Published in BBC Culture on April 12, 2018

“A eus le rag hwedhlow dyffrans?” So goes the first track on Le Kov, the second album by Welsh singer Gwenno Saunders. But it isn’t Welsh: it’s Cornish, a minority language spoken by fewer than a thousand people. The line translates as “is there room for different stories?” – and this is the question at the heart of her record, which celebrates variance in language, culture and identity. Continue reading “Welsh singer Gwenno’s new album is in Cornish. It’s one of many ‘lost’ languages being reborn”

The beer for people who don’t like beer

Published in Munchies on June 17, 2016

Your jaw tightens, your tongue tingles, and your cheeks pucker like you’ve downed a shot of vinegar. A first taste of sour beer often comes as a rather sharp shock. But it can soon prove addictive stuff: the perfect crisp, refreshing pint to sup in the sunshine. Continue reading “The beer for people who don’t like beer”