Stockard Channing: ‘I like to think there could be a return to civilised discourse, intelligent diplomacy…’

Published in The i on August 1, 2017

To have one iconic part you’re associated with forever can be a joy, or a drag. Stockard Channing has two. Continue reading “Stockard Channing: ‘I like to think there could be a return to civilised discourse, intelligent diplomacy…’”

Sophie Okonedo: ‘My body is my barometer – my instincts are physical’

Published in The Observer on April 23, 2017

Sophie Okonedo was born in 1968 in London and studied at Rada. She has worked extensively across theatre, film and TV and was nominated for a best supporting actress Oscar for the 2004 film Hotel Rwanda. Continue reading “Sophie Okonedo: ‘My body is my barometer – my instincts are physical’”

Freya Mavor: from Skins to stardom

Published in The i on April 11, 2017

Ten years ago, Skins sauntered onto our TV screens, spliff and vodka bottle in hand. It showed a bunch of teenagers in Bristol getting messy and messing up, but had a big heart too. The smartest move was casting unknown teenagers – but Skins alumni have gone on to conquer the West End, TV schedules and Hollywood. Continue reading “Freya Mavor: from Skins to stardom”

Why Love Actually is not the heartwarming rom-com you’re remembering

Published in The Independent on March 22, 2017

Fourteen years after it first schmaltzed up our cinema screens, Love Actually is back. Richard Curtis has filmed a short reunion for Comic Relief. Obviously, that’s a marvellous cause and everyone please give generously to charity. But if there’s one film which does not deserved to be looked on charitably, it’s surely Love Actually. Continue reading “Why Love Actually is not the heartwarming rom-com you’re remembering”

The women making fearless sex comedies

Published in BBC Culture on February 10, 2017

The Girls have grown up. The show’s creator Lena Dunham is now in her 30s and the sixth season of her caustic, Brooklyn-based comedy will be the last. It starts this weekend on US TV, and from the trailer it appears there’s as much hook-up angst, mad dancing, and messed-up – but deep-running – friendship as ever. Continue reading “The women making fearless sex comedies”

Hattie Morahan on new BBC Drama My Mother and Other Strangers

Published in The Telegraph on November 13, 2016

You know you’ve made it as an actor when you inspire someone to write a whole television series around you. And that’s happened for Hattie Morahan: scriptwriter Barry Devlin created new BBC One drama My Mother and Other Strangers with her in mind. Continue reading “Hattie Morahan on new BBC Drama My Mother and Other Strangers”

The artist getting men to act out their girls with guns fantasies

Published in Vice on October 25, 2016

“All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun.” So claimed French film director Jean-Luc Godard back in the 1960s. This quote that hit home for performance artist Louise Orwin, partly because the 29-year-old recognized the uneasy truth in it: She’s long loved the smoulder of the femme fatale, and grew up on a diet of Westerns, road movies, and Tarantino. Continue reading “The artist getting men to act out their girls with guns fantasies”

In his centenary year, Roald Dahl is everywhere – but should kids just go back to the books?

Published in The Independent on September 1, 2016

When news broke of the death of Gene Wilder, the image that kept cropping up was of the actor as the fabulously twinkly, slightly menacing Willy Wonka. Because the 1971 musical movie of Roald Dahl’s classic children’s book – Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – is burned deep into our collective conscious. Continue reading “In his centenary year, Roald Dahl is everywhere – but should kids just go back to the books?”

Samantha Morton: how Stanley Kubrick’s 2001 provided an escape from a traumatic childhood

Published in The Independent on July 7, 2016

Actress Samantha Morton has written a short film for a new exhibition, Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick, at Somerset House this summer. Organised by artist, DJ and record label boss James Lavelle, the show asks artists, musicians and filmmakers to respond to Kubrick’s films, and features Anish Kapoor, Sarah Lucas, Jarvis Cocker, and Gavin Turk. Continue reading “Samantha Morton: how Stanley Kubrick’s 2001 provided an escape from a traumatic childhood”