Jessica Barden on Pinter and the return of ‘The End of the F***ing World’

Published in The i on November 6, 2018

The day I meet Jessica Barden, the first image at the top of her Instagram is a black and white photograph of Harold Pinter captioned “Bae. Harold.” Beneath that, young fans tell her how much they love her Netflix series The End of The F***ing World (TEOTFW). Continue reading “Jessica Barden on Pinter and the return of ‘The End of the F***ing World’”

How LSD influenced Western culture

Published in BBC Culture on October 17, 2018

When you think of LSD, a very specific aesthetic probably leaps to mind: the psychedelic pink-and-orange swirls of the 60s; naked people with flowers in their hair; the shimmer of a sitar. After its psychedelic properties were accidentally discovered in the lab by Albert Hofmann in 1943, the drug was banned in the UK in 1966. LSD is still most strongly associated with hippies who embraced its mind-expanding properties. Continue reading “How LSD influenced Western culture”

Why The Beatles’ Yellow Submarine is a trippy cult classic

Published in BBC Culture on July 25, 2018

In 1968, The Beatles got in a yellow submarine and sailed away to the sea of green – on screen at least – in an animated caper designed to fulfil their three-picture contract for United Artists, without much effort on their part. Continue reading “Why The Beatles’ Yellow Submarine is a trippy cult classic”

Andrew Scott: ‘There was no Hamlet rivalry with Benedict Cumberbatch’

Published in The Observer on June 17, 2018

Andrew Scott, 41, was born and raised in Dublin. Recently seen in the BBC adaptation of King Lear, he is best known for playing Moriarty in Sherlock, and for starring in Robert Icke’s production of Hamlet, which transferred from the Almeida to the West End last year. In 2008, Simon Stephens wrote Sea Wall – a monologue about grief – for Scott; it is being revived as part of the Old Vic’s bicentenary celebrations. Continue reading “Andrew Scott: ‘There was no Hamlet rivalry with Benedict Cumberbatch’”

Michaela Coel on her Black Mirror episode & future of Chewing Gum

Published in Refinery29 on December 29, 2017

From council estate to outer space: Michaela Coel’s career is going stratospheric. You’ll know her as the writer and star of the adorably filthy, funny, London-set comedy Chewing Gum, a sleeper hit for Channel 4 that went worldwide after being picked up by Netflix. But the 30-year-old is next to be seen in the new series of Charlie Brooker’s Black Mirror. Continue reading “Michaela Coel on her Black Mirror episode & future of Chewing Gum”

Stockard Channing: ‘I like to think there could be a return to civilised discourse, intelligent diplomacy…’

Published in The i on August 1, 2017

To have one iconic part you’re associated with forever can be a joy, or a drag. Stockard Channing has two. Continue reading “Stockard Channing: ‘I like to think there could be a return to civilised discourse, intelligent diplomacy…’”