Meet Thomas McCrudden, the violent criminal squaring up to his past on stage

Published in The Telegraph on August 17, 2017

There’s a scene in Doglife, one of this year’s most talked-about plays at the Edinburgh Fringe, where the wife of a Glaswegian gangland enforcer, confronting him about his job, suddenly writhes onstage as if experiencing the violence he inflicts on others. Continue reading “Meet Thomas McCrudden, the violent criminal squaring up to his past on stage”

I went to the maddest interactive shows on the Fringe so you don’t have to

Published in The Independent on August 14, 2017

It’s midnight, and I’m lying on a massage table on stage in front of a room full of people. I’m gripping a cucumber between my thighs, which a tall Australian man is demonstrating his hand-job technique on. Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the Edinburgh Fringe. Continue reading “I went to the maddest interactive shows on the Fringe so you don’t have to”

I’m drinking eight cans of cider onstage every day for a month

Published in Vice on August 14, 2017

They say you have to suffer for your art. But whoever “they” are presumably aren’t talking about binge-drinking cider in public on a daily basis for a month. Mind you, that’s not stopping actor David William Bryan from doing exactly that at this year’s Edinburgh Fringe festival, all in the name of theatre. Whether theatre will thank him is another matter altogether.

Continue reading “I’m drinking eight cans of cider onstage every day for a month”

Review: Martin Creed’s Words and Music, EIF

Published in Fest on August 7, 2017

Artist Martin Creed’s show defies easy categorisation. He shares some thoughts, from the problem with trousers to the inadequacies of language to explanations of his sculptures. He plays some songs: some illustrate his musings, some are aural non-sequiturs. Continue reading “Review: Martin Creed’s Words and Music, EIF”

Review: Daffodils, a play with songs, Traverse

Published in Fest on August 8, 2016

Eric’s parents met in a patch of daffodils by a lake. As an 18 year old, in 1964, he sees Rose in that same patch — drunk, covered in mud and vomit — and takes her home. As meet-cutes go, its troubling nature is oddly ignored: this is the start of what seems like a very sweet, very conventional romance, inspired by New Zealand playwright Rochelle Bright’s own parents. Continue reading “Review: Daffodils, a play with songs, Traverse”

Where to eat, drink and laugh at the Edinburgh Fringe

Published in Refinery29 on August 1, 2016

Edinburgh in August. The city heaves, every basement, lecture theatre or church transformed into a venue for theatre, comedy, circus and really weird performance art. There are over three thousand shows during the month, from school kids doing Shakespeare to Broadway hits arriving for the ‘proper’ Edinburgh International Festival, off the back of which the Fringe initially sprung up back in 1947. Continue reading “Where to eat, drink and laugh at the Edinburgh Fringe”

Why Ross and Rachel’s relationship was doomed

Published in The Debrief on May 27, 2016

Ross and Rachel: on again, off again, on a break. But of course they were eventually on. They might have started as the ultimate will-they won’t-they couple, but they were meant to be together, right? That final episode of Friends was always going to be The One where they realised they’d already found The One. Continue reading “Why Ross and Rachel’s relationship was doomed”