Review: Daffodils, a play with songs, Traverse

Published in Fest on August 8, 2016

Eric’s parents met in a patch of daffodils by a lake. As an 18 year old, in 1964, he sees Rose in that same patch — drunk, covered in mud and vomit — and takes her home. As meet-cutes go, its troubling nature is oddly ignored: this is the start of what seems like a very sweet, very conventional romance, inspired by New Zealand playwright Rochelle Bright’s own parents. Continue reading “Review: Daffodils, a play with songs, Traverse”

Where to eat, drink and laugh at the Edinburgh Fringe

Published in Refinery29 on August 1, 2016

Edinburgh in August. The city heaves, every basement, lecture theatre or church transformed into a venue for theatre, comedy, circus and really weird performance art. There are over three thousand shows during the month, from school kids doing Shakespeare to Broadway hits arriving for the ‘proper’ Edinburgh International Festival, off the back of which the Fringe initially sprung up back in 1947. Continue reading “Where to eat, drink and laugh at the Edinburgh Fringe”

Why Ross and Rachel’s relationship was doomed

Published in The Debrief on May 27, 2016

Ross and Rachel: on again, off again, on a break. But of course they were eventually on. They might have started as the ultimate will-they won’t-they couple, but they were meant to be together, right? That final episode of Friends was always going to be The One where they realised they’d already found The One. Continue reading “Why Ross and Rachel’s relationship was doomed”

Review: Ross & Rachel, Edinburgh

Published in The Independent on August 17, 2015

What would have happened to Rachel and Ross from Friends after the fairytale ending? How would their relationship fare with children, aging, restlessness, boredom, sickness, and death? These are the questions asked by James Fritz’s perfectly formed play, a one-woman duologue performed with forensic focus by Molly Vevers. She flits between playing Rachel and Ross; words bubble out of her lips in double-time, but with clarity and flair. Continue reading “Review: Ross & Rachel, Edinburgh”

Review: Institute, Gecko, Edinburgh

Published in The Independent on August 16, 2015

Performed by four male dancers from physical theatre company Gecko, Institute’s ‘story’ is as shifting and fluid as their deliciously watchable movement – it twists and turns and tangles up like their bodies. We seem to begin in some kind of cartoonishly dystopian office, with absurdly outsized filing cabinets. Continue reading “Review: Institute, Gecko, Edinburgh”

Review: Filthy Talk for Troubled Times, Basic Mountain, Edinburgh

Published in Fest on August 15, 2015

Why revive Neil LaBute’s 1990 debut play? It’s a short, unpleasant, rarely-performed piece set in a strip club, where dumb, cruel men and a couple of waitresses banter, each breaking out to address the audience with tales supposed to be out-there in their honesty. Maybe they had bite 25 years ago; now they reek of cliché. Continue reading “Review: Filthy Talk for Troubled Times, Basic Mountain, Edinburgh”

Lee Hall and Vicky Featherstone on bringing riotous schoolgirls to the stage

Published in The Independent on Sunday on August 9, 2015

Playwright Lee Hall is best known for Billy Elliot, the inspirational, heart-warming film and musical about a boy who wants to be a ballet dancer and who overcomes the odds to achieve his dream. Now, Hall has turned his attention to the story of a Scottish Catholic schoolgirl choir, travelling to Edinburgh to compete in a singing competition. Hankies at the ready for the big emotional numbers, right? Continue reading “Lee Hall and Vicky Featherstone on bringing riotous schoolgirls to the stage”