Samantha Morton: how Stanley Kubrick’s 2001 provided an escape from a traumatic childhood

Published in The Independent on July 7, 2016

Actress Samantha Morton has written a short film for a new exhibition, Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick, at Somerset House this summer. Organised by artist, DJ and record label boss James Lavelle, the show asks artists, musicians and filmmakers to respond to Kubrick’s films, and features Anish Kapoor, Sarah Lucas, Jarvis Cocker, and Gavin Turk. Continue reading “Samantha Morton: how Stanley Kubrick’s 2001 provided an escape from a traumatic childhood”

Are Nineties throw-backs a theatrical comfort blanket?

Published in What's on Stage on June 15, 2016

Do you know every single word of “A Whole New World”? Can you answer without a moment’s hesitation which Hogwarts house you’d be in? Do you know exactly what a Ross and Rachel couple is? Congratulations: not only are you a classic child of the Nineties, but you’re also now the theatre’s new favourite customer. Continue reading “Are Nineties throw-backs a theatrical comfort blanket?”

Jack Thorne on staging disability and transporting Harry Potter to the West End

Published in The Independent on Sunday on February 21, 2016

His face may not be familiar, but there’s a good chance you’ve seen one of Jack Thorne’s TV programmes – Skins, Glue, This is England ’86, (and ’88 and ’90 come to that), The Fades – or maybe his hit stage version of vampire movie Let the Right One In, or council budget-cuts drama Hope, which played at the Royal Court. Continue reading “Jack Thorne on staging disability and transporting Harry Potter to the West End”

Review: peddling, Arcola

Published in The Independent on March 9, 2015

Into a black gauze cube, Harry Melling drops from the ceiling to a burst of loud dance music. It may only be a couple of metres squared, but Melling will rattle around in this cage effectively, taking us on a journey through London: from so-posh-they’re-empty mansioned streets to multi-storey car parks where the down-and-out can kip. It’s a journey of self-discovery too for the “Boy”, as this unnamed disaffected youth struggles to make sense of his place within the world, and his own troubled upbringing.

Melling penned the piece; his first play, it opened at the HighTide new writing festival before proving a hit in New York. The Boy is engaged in a scam for a “bossman”, going door-to-door peddling his wares (household cleaning products), supposedly as part of “Boris’ young offenders scheme.” Continue reading “Review: peddling, Arcola”