The women poets taking over the world

Published in BBC Culture on July 14, 2017

Poetry. Does the word make you think of rarefied tomes on dusty bookshelves, po-faced readings with glasses of warm white wine, or trudging dutifully through homework? It shouldn’t. Poetry is exploding in popularity: igniting Instagram, streaming on Spotify, being shared on Twitter and going viral on YouTube. Continue reading “The women poets taking over the world”

Patti Smith’s Horses at 40: Lenny Kaye, Viv Albertine and more pay homage to the iconic album

Published in The Independent on Sunday on May 31, 2015

“Jesus died for somebody’s sins, but not mine.” Forty years ago, Patti Smith opened her astonishing debut album Horses with these immortal words. Delivered over piano chords with a slow, deliberate certainty, it was the unmistakable statement of a 28-year-old woman taking complete ownership of her life and sound. Continue reading “Patti Smith’s Horses at 40: Lenny Kaye, Viv Albertine and more pay homage to the iconic album”

How synaesthesia inspires artists

Published in BBC Culture on September 4, 2014

The experience of colour as we usually understand it is a visual one: objects have colour, artists use colour, and we can recall a colour in our mind’s eye. But for some people, colour is a more multi-sensory affair, linked to sound, texture, taste or shapes. Music has a hue – like the parping of a trumpet that evokes a shower of burnt orange. Numbers, letters and days of the week have their own shade: the number one is white, the letter L is blue and Monday is red. Continue reading “How synaesthesia inspires artists”