My novel The Start of Something is published!

On 11 April 2024, my second novel came out in hardback, published by Orion… I managed to to celebrate it twice, with a launch party at The Devereux in London and in Sheffield, upstairs at The Rutland and organised by the wonderful Juno Books. Plus a cheery bookshop tour, meaning there are signed copies available in Burley Fisher, Foyles, The LRB Bookshop, and Waterstones in Islington, Tottenham Court Road and Sheffield!

And I was lucky enough to get some very generous press…

Continue reading “My novel The Start of Something is published!”

An open relationship taught me everything I needed to know about love

Published in The Independent on April 2, 2024

Sleeping with someone other than your partner is the ultimate betrayal – the worst thing you can do in a romantic relationship, right? Not necessarily. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that the best lessons I’ve learned in how to be a good partner, and have a good relationship, came from exploring non-monogamy.

Continue reading “An open relationship taught me everything I needed to know about love”

Review: Memory Piece, Lisa Ko

Published in The Observer on March 24, 2024

The first section of Lisa Ko’s novel follows a Chinese-American artist, Giselle Chin, who in 1996 begins a durational work called Memory Piece: she writes down her memories for seven hours a day, for a year – and at the end she burns the lot. But in Memory Piece, the book, the documenting of life becomes something precious and worth preserving.

Continue reading “Review: Memory Piece, Lisa Ko”

Murderer, manipulator… or not that bad at all? The reframing of Richard III

Published in The Observer on March 3, 2024

For a king who has been dead for more than 500 years, Richard III has been making a remarkable number of headlines this winter. And yes – many of them are discontented. From fights among historians over his actions to casting controversies around fictionalised depictions, Richard III is more contentious than ever.

Continue reading “Murderer, manipulator… or not that bad at all? The reframing of Richard III”

Heather Agyepong: ‘A black love story that doesn’t centre trauma? Refreshing’

Published in The i on February 26, 2024

“Love is messy, right?” Heather Agyepong asks, from deep within the run of rehearsals for Shifters, a new show in which she plays one half in a tender, funny, and, yes, pretty messy romantic relationship.

Continue reading “Heather Agyepong: ‘A black love story that doesn’t centre trauma? Refreshing’”

Review: Strictly Come Dancing Live, Birmingham Utilita Arena

Published in The Telegraph on January 20, 2024

After a particularly fine 20th season – with a blisteringly high standard of dancing that drew almost 10 million viewers for the final – Strictly heads out on the road, with many of the season’s most impressive talents signed up. And Krishnan Guru-Murthy is there too.

Continue reading “Review: Strictly Come Dancing Live, Birmingham Utilita Arena”

Review: Shed: Exploded View, Royal Exchange

Published in The Telegraph on February 16, 2024

It’s a lesser-seen sort of stage adaptation – but occasionally, playwrights take inspiration from great works of art. Tim Crouch’s An Oak Tree drew on Michael Craig-Martin’s artwork. Sondheim riffed on Seurat in Sunday in the Park with George. And in Shed: Exploded View, Phoebe Eclair-Powell was inspired by Cornelia Parker’s installation of a blown-up garden shed to explode her own theatrical form.

Continue reading “Review: Shed: Exploded View, Royal Exchange”

Is Millennial nostalgia ruining musicals?

Published in The i on January 19, 2024

“This isn’t your mother’s Mean Girls” went the trailer tagline for the new movie version of the stage musical adaptation of Tina Fey’s adored 2004 film. Aside from seeming precision-tooled to enrage aging millennials, this tagline was also, it turns out, misleading: the new film, out this week, is a re-tread of the old, with added smartphones and songs.

Continue reading “Is Millennial nostalgia ruining musicals?”

Coding is the new clubbing: on the rise and rise of algorave

Published in The Tribune on December 9, 2023

Legend has it that algorave was invented on the M1. It was 2011, and Alex McLean was driving to a gig with his friend Nick Collins; both live coders, they would make electronic music on stage in real time — effectively, writing instructions in code that tell a computer what sounds to play, in what order.

Continue reading “Coding is the new clubbing: on the rise and rise of algorave”

Announcing my next book… The Start of Something, arriving April 2024

I’m excited to reveal that my second novel is coming out in hardback, e-book and audio-book in April 2024, published by Orion. And here’s the blurb…

‘Bold, playful, generous and lush, it’s a story that feels both timeless and urgent – I loved it. Gorgeously and relentlessly queer.’ DAISY BUCHANAN

Continue reading “Announcing my next book… The Start of Something, arriving April 2024”