Review: On Connection, Kae Tempest

Published in The Observer October 25, 2020

Kae Tempest has added one more string to an already crowded bow: On Connection is the first nonfiction work by this Mercury prize-winning musician, Ted Hughes award-winning poet, acclaimed playwright, novelist, and chief creative chronicler of the last decade. It’s also Tempest’s first publication since changing their name from Kate, and using they/them pronouns.

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Tinuke Craig: ‘Part of me feels Black Lives Matter brought people together; part thinks people were bored’

Published in The i paper October 28, 2020

“I had this anxiety that I would just be extremely rusty,” says Tinuke Craig, with an apologetic smile, when I ask how it feels to be back in a rehearsal room. While the director is thrilled to be preparing for a socially distanced production and live stream of Sarah Kane’s stark, poetic play Crave at Chichester Festival Theatre, she was nervous about getting back to work, too.

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Rufus Norris on theatre and class: There’s ‘an awful danger’ that only people with money can survive in the industry

Published in The i Paper September 24, 2020

When lockdown was announced, Francesca Martinez’s play All of Us was in its final week of rehearsals at the National Theatre.

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‘There will be positives’: artistic directors on theatre’s terrible year

Published in The Observer September 27, 2020

Last summer, the Observer profiled a group of newly-appointed artistic directors – a fresh surge of talent taking its place at the top of six of our best-loved theatre companies. A notably diverse cohort, they were bursting with optimism and ideas for shaking up the industry.

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Review: More Than a Woman by Caitlin Moran

Published in The Observer September 7, 2020

It’s hard to overstate just how influential Caitlin Moran’s How to Be a Woman was when published in 2011 – and how far we’ve come since. Nine years on and the feminism she had to advocate for has become thoroughly, totally mainstream, while perky books by clever journalists about every conceivable aspect of being a woman have proliferated in the ground Moran tilled.

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How Björk has helped me heal from heartbreak

Published in BBC Culture August 21, 2020

We often hear about break-up albums – records made by artists in the throes of heartbreak, destined to be listened to on repeat by fans when they have their own wounds to lick. But there’s also a lesser-recognised musical phenomenon: the putting-yourself-back-together record.

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3-D Sound and a Zoom Apocalypse: The Plays That Come to Life Online

Published in The New York Times May 20, 2020

There’s a voice inside your head, and it’s telling you the story of a man who went into the Amazon and came out with a new understanding of human consciousness. It whispers in your left ear, then your right. Then it seems to take up residence right inside your skull.

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