The surprising ways that Victorians flirted

Published in BBC Culture January 17, 2022

Look up the term “collage”, and the Tate’s website will inform you that this cut-and-paste method for making new work was “first used as an artists’ technique in the early 20th Century.” Generally, Picasso and Braque get credited with inventing collage, with Picasso’s decision to paste oilcloth into his painting Still Life with Chair Caning in 1912 considered a firing shot for an explosion of avant-garde art.

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Why assume it’s a problem if a woman is child-free at thirty? Maybe she prefers it that way

Published in The Observer January 30, 2022

It was news last week that women are having fewer children and at a later age: the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reported that more than half of women in England and Wales don’t have children by the time they are 30. But it hardly felt surprising to me.

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Review: She Loves Me, Sheffield Crucible

Published in The Telegraph December 17, 2021

What a treat this is: a delicious romcom, staged with real wit and elan, so that it feels genuinely both romantic and very funny – not something revivals of old musicals always manage to pull off.

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Critic under the spotlight: the 12-hour play showcasing everyday jobs

Published in The Stage October 27, 2021

The theatre critic’s job is largely conducted in darkness and silence: we watch other people perform from the gloom of the stalls, and then write about it. But last Saturday, the spotlight – and the microphone – was quite literally turned on me, as I was grilled about my job in front of an audience on stage at Leeds Playhouse.

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Theatre goes hyper-local: Paines Plough brings its pop-up stage to Brixton

Published in the Evening Standard August 16, 2021

There’s a new pop-up coming to Brixton – and it’s not a trend-setting bar or foodie destination, but a theatre. Roundabout, an in-the-round venue run by theatre company Paines Plough, will sprout in Slade Gardens this month, offering ten days of live performance: four new plays performed in rep, plus cabaret, comedy and community workshops.

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How I learned not to worry about being cool and fell in love with Renoir again

Published in Elephant August 17, 2021

I was small enough to be picked up to see the painting, held comfortably in my father’s arms. It was a good print, in a good frame, hanging on the wall in my grandmother’s dining room. It is the first artwork I can remember really being aware of, and I loved it.

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