Chipo Chung: I had to go round the houses to get into theatre

Published in The Stage on September 14, 2017

When Chipo Chung last saw Christopher Marlowe’s Dido, Queen of Carthage, she didn’t understand it. Now, she’s about to play the queen herself at the Royal Shakespeare Company. Perhaps surprisingly, it’s the first time the company has staged the tragedy. Continue reading “Chipo Chung: I had to go round the houses to get into theatre”

Meet Thomas McCrudden, the violent criminal squaring up to his past on stage

Published in The Telegraph on August 17, 2017

There’s a scene in Doglife, one of this year’s most talked-about plays at the Edinburgh Fringe, where the wife of a Glaswegian gangland enforcer, confronting him about his job, suddenly writhes onstage as if experiencing the violence he inflicts on others. Continue reading “Meet Thomas McCrudden, the violent criminal squaring up to his past on stage”

I went to the maddest interactive shows on the Fringe so you don’t have to

Published in The Independent on August 14, 2017

It’s midnight, and I’m lying on a massage table on stage in front of a room full of people. I’m gripping a cucumber between my thighs, which a tall Australian man is demonstrating his hand-job technique on. Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the Edinburgh Fringe. Continue reading “I went to the maddest interactive shows on the Fringe so you don’t have to”

I’m drinking eight cans of cider onstage every day for a month

Published in Vice on August 14, 2017

They say you have to suffer for your art. But whoever “they” are presumably aren’t talking about binge-drinking cider in public on a daily basis for a month. Mind you, that’s not stopping actor David William Bryan from doing exactly that at this year’s Edinburgh Fringe festival, all in the name of theatre. Whether theatre will thank him is another matter altogether.

Continue reading “I’m drinking eight cans of cider onstage every day for a month”

Review: Martin Creed’s Words and Music, EIF

Published in Fest on August 7, 2017

Artist Martin Creed’s show defies easy categorisation. He shares some thoughts, from the problem with trousers to the inadequacies of language to explanations of his sculptures. He plays some songs: some illustrate his musings, some are aural non-sequiturs. Continue reading “Review: Martin Creed’s Words and Music, EIF”

Stockard Channing: ‘I like to think there could be a return to civilised discourse, intelligent diplomacy…’

Published in The i on August 1, 2017

To have one iconic part you’re associated with forever can be a joy, or a drag. Stockard Channing has two. Continue reading “Stockard Channing: ‘I like to think there could be a return to civilised discourse, intelligent diplomacy…’”

John Tiffany on bringing Road back to the Royal Court and how he made West End magic with Harry Potter

Published in Evening Standard on July 27, 2017

He’s the man who made the magic of Harry Potter come alive on stage: John Tiffany pulled off the near impossible trick of crafting a blockbuster show that pleased both obsessive fans and snooty critics alike. Continue reading “John Tiffany on bringing Road back to the Royal Court and how he made West End magic with Harry Potter”

Review: Ink, The Almeida

Published in The Independent on June 28, 2017

To 1969, when a beleaguered, high-minded newspaper is sold to an Australian sheep-farmer with ambitions to turn it into a popular tabloid. The rag is The Sun, the proprietor Rupert Murdoch – and the playwright retelling this story, This House writer James Graham. Continue reading “Review: Ink, The Almeida”